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Brown Palace Hotel Ship Tavern


no.043 2011-09-01 rev







This Brown Palace Hotel Ship Tavern ashtray has Broadmoor Pottery's successful red (Oxblood) glaze. The well cared for example has two nice Denver ink stamps.


These ashtrays are not highly rare and come up for auction occasionally. They are seven inches across and weigh almost one and a half pounds with a solid rim. The Ship Tavern patron collector of the 1930s would have found it to be quite a pocketful.
















This beauty was made in Colorado Springs. Broadmoor made the ashtrays at both Colorado Springs and Denver.










Added July, 2013 is this smaller Camark Potteries copyrighted Ship Tavern ashtray found at auction:











According to the seller this ashtray may have been made in the 1950s. It has the same red glaze as Broadmoor's most common and successful Oxblood glaze. It is obviously a cruder variation of the Broadmoor ashtrays but also likely harder to find. (Please see article #32 for a few more examples of Camark's red-glazed pottery.)




















The Ship Tavern Bar and Grill was founded in 1934. The less common postcard below shows an angle with the Tavern entrance just out of view to the right.



















This red bowl has a nice Ship Tavern "Next to the Post Office" ink stamp.




















The well embossed blue bowl was also made at Colorado Springs. These perhaps condiment bowls are not so hard to find and like the ashtrays were also made at Broadmoor in Denver.














This 1935 Refreshment Log listed many standard Tavern items. Inserted we found a Christmas dinner menu typed on a 1936 calendar.


















Ship Tavern Bar and Grill entrance and an old metal Tavern spinner.


















Years ago we lent our red Ship Tavern ashtray to the Brown Palace to display during their 100th anniversary celebration in 1992. We understand the hotel was not actually named after "Unsinkable Molly Brown" or even for the brown appearance of the stone but rather for the hotel's founder Henry Cordes Brown.











In March we snapped this shot on Broadway Ave looking north.














These 1930s Hotel ads appeared in Colorado Greeter's Guides.




















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